Of Good Report

Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things. ~ Philippians 4:8

Last night I found a video by the pseudonymous Millennial Woes, which video I can only describe as…lovely.

I’ll stop beating around the bush and just link it:

The channel author spends the first nine minutes reading aloud an article from The Imaginative Conservative depicting charity in the pre-war England countryside, and then the comments, interspersing his commentary in between.

The money shot is at 20:30, when, describing a world with a functioning social contract, he asks, “Is it not so nice?”

I think, sometimes, of all that’s possible with today’s technology.  We are rich beyond rich.  And yet…things seem to be going downhill.

What’s happened here is that, starting with an absurdity, we have reasoned ourselves into nonsense.  Our premise was that the purpose of economic activity is hedonism, ie, the satisfaction of human desires…But this isn’t the goal.  The goal, believe it or not, is to become better people.” ~ Moldbug

Virtue is the first, last, and only real safeguard any system of government has.  Even democracy works when it’s present.

And what is virtue?

Well, I’ll say it again: wise as serpents, harmless as doves.  A good king is both a) good and b) a king.

Seriously, when you get time, watch the whole video.  I don’t think you’ll regret it.

Two Useful Things, and It’s Sunday!

It is the Lord’s Day, and that is cause for rejoicing and contemplation.  

1.  Sic Transit Gloria

"Trooping through the streets of ancient Rome, conquering legions
under the standard of the eagle wheeled carts piled high with the
booty of war. Plundered were the treasuries of the vanquished. Gold,
silver, jewels, livestock and grain overflowed. Captured enemy
soldiers, their faces lowered in defeat and humiliation, were forced
at spear point to march past the cheering crowds of patriotic
patricians.

At the rear of the procession rolled Caesar?s chariot, equipped with
an unusual, human safety device. To prevent pride from consuming him,
the man of the hour had positioned a lowly servant at his side. His
sole responsibility was to temper the boundless enthusiasm expressed
by Caesar?s adoring fans with the three word warning, 'Sic Transit
Gloria.'

A literal Latin rendering of the phrase is translated 'Thus passes
glory.' A more fluent English version might be, 'All fame is
fleeting."

 

Now, seriously: Say “Sic transit gloria” out loud a few times.  To prevent you from feeling alone, I will say it, out loud, on my bed where I’m typing this:

“Sic Transit Gloria.”

“Sic Transit Gloria.”

“Sic Transit Gloria.”

(Yes, I did say it out loud.  Did you?)

The additive part:  

“Sic” means “Thus,” as in “Sic Semper Tyrannis” (“Thus always, to tyrants”)

Transit” means “passes” as in, well, transit.  

Gloria,” means glory, or fame.

(On this Sunday, if you are overflowing with joy, be perhaps a bit more contemplative, because it will pass; if you are laid down in despair, take hope, because this too shall pass).

Now say it again, and think yourself kind of cool for knowing a (very) little bit of Latin: Sic Transit Gloria

 

2.  One hotkey

I will win no prizes for changing your world today.  But maybe a tiny, small change.

If you’re on a Mac: Cmd + Shift + f will move the cursor to the address bar and start a search.  

On WindowsCtrl + K will do the same.*

 

That’s it.  It’s Sunday!

 

*Note that I don’t know if these work for Internet Explorer.  If you are using Internet Explorer, the nicest thing I can do for you is to say: do what it takes to get rid of internet explorer.  Email me if you need help.  There are others like you, and they’re alright now.  Everything’s going to be OK.

Done

This place attracts nerds.  You probably are one.  The main failing of nerds, to echo the linked post, is failure to provide value in the here and now.  

Nerds are good.  I am one.  They often focus on multipliers, and multipliers scale.  But there has to be something to multiply.

Neoreaction attracts nerds, and the whole movement/ideology/field of study is, I think, a giant multiplier.  So I think it has a great future.

It has a pretty crappy present though.

So!  As a nerd among nerds, a lover of multipliers among lovers of multipliers, I’m crossing the chasm.  Expect to see less theory here, and more mundane stuff.  How to change your oil.  Mnemonic tricks.  I’m aiming for stuff that will a)be useful to everybody b)will be easy to remember (expect a lot of mnemonics and movie references), and most of all, sparse.  I’ll be posting less, and posting better.

Have a good Thursday night.

Long Shots, Reserves

In our zeal, we sometimes find ourselves saying things like, “The Gospel is not about your personal happiness.”  We do this to urge obedience, and, overall, I think we should keep doing this.

However, it’s something of a simplification of the truth.  The truth is: the Gospel is about our personal happiness.  God loves us, and wants us to be happy.  The problem is that this is often rationalized to: “If it feels good, do it.”

Here is the actual, complicated but full truth:  The Gospel is about your happiness.  However, you are not in charge of it.  Your job in the Gospel basically comes down to:  obey, and surrender.  What happiness you find in the way is yours to keep, and with good will.  But you are not aiming for “a full life,” or personal fulfillment.  You are to lay up treasures in heaven, rather than on earth.

This is a long shot.  We have a Gospel made of long shots.  Adam’s curse was to be forced to choose between the bad, and the probably impossible.

So, we need to be good at taking long shots.

And since we’re all about learning from the world here at CB, we’ll take a page from those other constant long-shot takers, gamblers.  And the first rule of gambling is:

Don’t bet more than you can afford to lose.

Well now.  This puts us in a quandary.  The Gospel urges us to take long shots, and because they’re long shots, we’ll most likely lose—so how to deal?  The answer is:  be able to afford it.  Turning the other cheek will get you hit a lot—make sure you have some antibiotics and bandages at home.

If you tithe, or give to charity, that does not absolve you from being wise with your finances.  As everyone knows, giving money away is not a very good method of holding onto it.  The windows of heaven are promised, yes, but they might not come in time to pay the rent.  So: save.  Be prudent.  Have a reserve.

And, back to the sexy focus of this blog (as you can see, I am not above drawing the reader in with sex and money): don’t be nice to women if you can’t do it out of charity.  Better to avoid them completely.  Rather, you should build your emotional reserves.  Sleep enough.  Eat well.  Save some money.  Exercise.  Don’t gamble with your rent money.